The Destructive Nature Of The Joker And Bane In Batman Movies

MWA1 – Scars & Masks: Who Better To Break the Bat?

Gritty reboots have come to all kinds of stories. Batman comics are not an exception. Although Batman’s story was dark and bleak in certain aspects, it maintained a cartoonish and comical tone throughout its many retellings. The Dark Knight Trilogy was a new Batman movie adaptation that Christopher Nolan created in the early 2000s. The Dark Knight Rises and The Dark Knight Rises had completely new interpretations of Bane, and the Joker. The Joker was made a more mysterious and chaotic madman. Bane was transformed into a similar terrorist mastermind. Bane and Joker are antagonists in both films. Like all villains they guide the movie towards a destructive and problematic end. The Joker is a different type of villain, however. He terrorizes Gotham City more than Batman. The Joker, with his simple and effective attack on Batman and Gotham City methods, is more powerful than Bane.

Gotham City has many great things. They are known for their unique cost-efficient inner cities transportation system and rampant criminality. The city would cease to exist if it didn’t have at least six muggings on each block. The city accepts that more crime is happening than can be stopped by an ominous caped crusader disguised as a flying rodent. People need to be worried only when there is an oddly-shaped criminal that stands taller than all the others. While it is preferable to wear a themed outfit and speak in an alien manner, this is not essential. Bane, the Joker, and Bane had the same goal of destroying Gotham. Bane wanted to kill Gotham in order for the League of Shadows to eradicate Gotham. But the Joker was simply after chaos. Bane used chaos to his advantage, causing a riot amongst the prisoners and allowing Bruce Wayne to take his entire arsenal. However, the Joker wanted the world’s view to reflect his sadistic nature. He wanted Batman break his only rule and to kill him. Bane wanted Gotham destroyed using a nuclear weapon. The Joker wanted Gotham killed. Bane devised a plan that would use terror and pain to accomplish his goal, but the Joker only had one motive: to make the world as insane as himself. The Joker makes a heap of money and burns the man alive, proving that he never sought riches. The Joker actually stole that money to fuel an economic crash and starve organized crime’s dogs. The Joker was also a highly successful villain because he didn’t tie himself to any backstory. Ra’s al Ghul’s child revealed Bane’s backstory. However, the Joker refuses to reveal his true backstory. The Joker uses two stories to explain the scars he has, each serving a different purpose. He tells a crime ringleader his father cut his mouth at the corners. This man reminds him of his father. This is a very suspenseful telling that strongly suggests the Joker’s plans for his victim. Rachel Dawson learns a different story about the Joker’s scars later, as he crashes a dinner party at Bruce Wayne’s home. This story has a bigger audience than he expected, and he needs to alter his goals. Rachel hears from him that his scars have been caused by self-mutilation.

The Joker is portrayed in this story as an obviously mentally unstable man. The Joker is able to make this assumption because he pretends to be a lunatic, but he has a thousand plans, with no clear goal. The Joker even tried to tell a third version of the story on Batman near the end, but it was too late. The Joker makes use of his lackluster background to his advantage. This can be used to instill fear in the victims or tactical advantage. Bane has a backstory, however. He is tied to the League of Shadows through his ties and connections to Ra’s al Ghul. These ties explain his motives and plans as well as his relation with other characters in this movie’s plot. Bane would not be able to benefit from the Joker’s information.

Last but not least, Bane and Joker have a final fight: breaking the Bat. The Batman is affected by both villains, but their methods are very different. Bane actually snaps the Bat’s back and places it on top of his knee. He then places Bruce Wayne in prison on the other side, forcing him to view a live broadcast of Gotham City being destroyed by Bane’s plans. The Joker, on his part, plans to mentally break Bruce Wayne by killing his girlfriend in an oil-fired explosion and then turning Harvey Dent over as a criminal. This is followed by the execution of Commissioner Gordon. Bruce must recover from his injuries and be stronger by following the methods of Bane. Bruce Wayne is so upset by the Joker’s tactics that he can no longer keep his Batman role. Batman tells Dent that he killed Dent because he had to save his son. This was to make Gotham see Dent more as a martyr for social injustice than the monster he turned out to be. Bruce, however, has to let the misery take its toll. Bruce’s death leaves him in deep depression, making him a recluse and making him a cold-blooded murderer. The Joker’s actions leave a lasting impression on Bruce Wayne. It also sets the scene for The Dark Knight Rises.

It is no surprise that the villains in both movies have done more damage to each other than the one they were portraying. Gotham police capture Joker, who has already devastated Gotham city’s economics, kidnapped an international dignitary, caused great distress to Batman, mentally damaged Gotham’s best attorney, and brutally murdered many politicians, cops, civilians, and other officials. He is a villain that can only be defeated when he is left alone. Batman, however, thwarted Bane’s plan. Bane was killed as a martyr because of his failed cause. The Joker proves that terroristism, with all its untold deaths and inhumane cruelty, can work. This fact haunts Bane and may be his most infamous trick.

Author

  • marthareynolds

    I'm Martha, a 27-year-old blogger, volunteer, and student. I'm a graduate of the University of Utah, where I studied communications and political science. I'm passionate about education and volunteer work, and I love spending time with my family and friends.

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